Peach and Plum Granitas: The Easiest Way to Deal with Summertime Bounty

You’ve had it with making peach cobblers and plum preserves. Your coworkers are saying, “no thank you” to your offered bags of ripe fruit. You look out your window and sigh at all the fallen fruit underneath the trees, but just don’t have the heart anymore to go out and collect them. You secretly wish you had knocked off half the fruit when they first started growing in the Spring.

Now what are you gonna do?

Plum Granita and Peach Lime Ginger Granita

plum granita


Except for a fig tree, we don’t have any fruit trees in our yard. However, our friends have a peach tree and a plum tree in theirs. When they invited us over last week for a swim and supper, they were only too happy to let us take their ripe fruit home as well.

At first, we ate them as is. Then as they started to soften, Annie made a couple of cobblers. Finally, they started to really get soft and the fruit flies started buzzing. We had to do something.

I looked up some recipes on making granitas and thought, “man, this is easy!”. Make simple syrup, puree peaches, freeze, scrape, eat. I think I can handle that.

As I was preparing to cook, I had an inspired moment. What can I do to riff off of the standard recipe? What flavor do I like with peach? I recalled that one of my favorite teas is Ginger Peach by Republic of Tea. There’s a sweet-spicy balance to it that I particularly enjoy.

So as I made the simple syrup, I sliced a thumb of ginger into slivers and boiled them along with the cup of sugar and cup of water:

Ginger-infused simple syrup

ginger infused syrup

I cut up 6 large peaches and blended them in a blender, along with the slivers of ginger from the syrup. Then I strained the puree through a sieve. To the puree I added the juice of one lime:

Squeezing lime juice into peach puree

squeezing lime juice into peach puree

I added the ginger syrup to the puree, then poured the puree into a shallow dish that went into the freezer. After the mixture hardened, I used a fork to scrape it up into coarse granules.

Plum Granita

The plum granita recipe is a slightly different process. I cut up a pound of ripe plums in half, removed the pits, and boiled them with a couple cups of water and a half cup of sugar.

Recipe by David Lebovitz via MattBites.

plums boiling

After boiling for 8 minutes, I removed them to cool, then pureed them in the blender. Into a shallow dish and into the freezer it went. Once it was frozen, I did the fork scrape thing.

For some reason, the peach-ginger-lime granita came out with a better, more granular texture than the plum granita. The plum granita was more crystalline in structure.

peach granita

The verdict? I can’t say. The peach granita was more sweet, and the ginger was a nice surprise. The plum granita was also sweet, but had a hint of bitterness at the end.

Both would be excellent and easy ways to deal with Summer’s bounty of fruit.

How do you deal with too much fruit in your backyards? Leave me a comment!

Aloha, Nate

8 Comments Post a Comment
  1. Sangeeth says:

    >luved the pic…u have a surprise in my blog :)

  2. Nate-n-Annie says:

    >@Sangeeth – thank you, I am honored!

  3. Alexa says:

    >Cool. I love granita. The plum one especially caught my attention. Thanks for the delicious inspiration!

  4. My Sweet & Saucy says:

    >What great flavors for granita! Love them!

  5. Nate-n-Annie says:

    >@Alexa – you're welcome, and thanks for visiting!

    @My Sweet & Saucy – I hope you get to try them out!

  6. Sophie says:

    >We would like to feature this recipe on our blog. Please email sophiekiblogger@gmail.com if interested. Thanks :)

    You can check out our blog here: http://blog.keyingredient.com/

  7. deeba says:

    I absolutely loved the peach-ginger granita recipe…was a winner. Found a nice plum-vanilla one on Epicurious Thank you for sharing this so beautifully!

Leave a Reply




About Us

My Photo Annie is mistress of the kitchen while Nate is the master of the grill and smoker. We cook the homestyle Asian and Hawaiian foods of our younger days while also exploring the wider worlds of Western foods.

Learn more about us by clicking here: About House of Annie.

Find and Follow Us

Follow House of Annie on Twitter

Shop Amazon and Support HoA

Some posts have links to products sold on Amazon.com. House of Annie receives a few cents on the dollar when someone follows the links and buys a product. Thanks for your support!